Posted 1 month ago

hms-surprise:

Watercolour Painting of an Orca by eriksherman

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

allthingseurope:

Herceg Novi, Montenegro (by Miki Badt)

Posted 1 month ago
tammuz:

Assyrian ivory plaque from the ancient city of Nimrud, with a worrier slaying a griffin, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Worrier? :-P

tammuz:

Assyrian ivory plaque from the ancient city of Nimrud, with a worrier slaying a griffin, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Worrier? :-P

Posted 1 month ago

ancientpeoples:

Kneeling Female Figure

2nd Century AD

Jalisco Culture

Mexico

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

art-of-swords:

Sabre with undulated blade

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Indopersian
  • Measurements: overall length 76 cm

The sword has a large, undulated, double-edged, damask blade, ribbed at the centre, with a double fuller on the entire length except for the tip, which is slightly thicker. Apparently the blade is quite unusual.

The iron grip, of almost elliptical section, features a beak-shaped pommel bent on a side. The surface of the grip is decorated with silver-inlaid floral motifs and geometrical frames. The pommel has a relieved rosette on both faces.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Posted 1 month ago

ancientart:

Depictions of dolphins in ancient art.

Dolphin, Greece, 300 BC-AD 100. Courtesy of the LACMAAC1992.152.16.

Dolphins and OctopusesPhiale with decoration in superposed colour, ca. 510–500 BC. From Eretria. Courtesy of the LouvreMNB 624. Photo by Jastrow.

Dolphin mosaic from the Baths of Buticosus, Ostia Antica. Roman, 2nd century. Photo by Roger Ulrich.

Dolphin fresco, Knossos, Crete, 1700-1450 BC. Photo by H-stt, via the Wiki Commons.

Youth playing the flute and riding a dolphin. Red-figure stamnos, 360–340 BC. Alcestis Group, from Etruria. Courtesy of the National Archaeological Museum of Spain. Photo by Jastrow, via the Wiki Commons.

Fish (Dolphin), Syria or Palestine, 300-400. Courtesy of the LACMAM.88.129.118.

Posted 1 month ago

littlelimpstiff14u2:

These stunning photographs, which look like a glorious late evening sky with dashes of pink and purple, are actually pictures of Japan’s largest wisteria (or wistaria, depending on whom you ask) plant.

This plant, located in Ashikaga Flower Park in Japan, is certainly not the largest in the world, but it still comes in at an impressive 1,990 square meters (or half an acre) and dates back to around 1870 (the largest, at about 4,000 square meters, is the wisteria vine in Sierra Madre, California). Although wisterias can look like trees, they’re actually vines. Because its vines have the potential to get very heavy, this plant’s entire structure is held up on steel supports, allowing visitors to walk below its canopy and bask in the pink and purple light cast by its beautiful hanging blossoms.

Image credits: Takao Tsushima

Posted 1 month ago

ancientpeoples:

Scarab Inscribed with the Throne Name of Thutmosis III

Early 18th Dynasty, New Kingdom

c.1479-1458 BC

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Posted 1 month ago

Andy Goldsworthy’s art

(Source: lissycposts)

Posted 1 month ago

ancientpeoples:

Ritual Wine Cup with Cover (Zhi)

Shang Dynasty

c.1300 BC

China

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

Posted 1 month ago

abracabrona:

swiggityswonkity:

abracabrona:

theoclast:

Mamie please do this

Mamie. Please don’t do this.

I will do this

Please, no.

Mamie do it

(Source: barack-obottm)

Posted 1 month ago

art-of-swords:

Dha Sword

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Burmese
  • Medium: steel, wood, silver
  • Measurements: overall length: 72.5 cm (28-1/2 inches)

The wooden hilt and scabbard are fully silver-plated with blossoms and scrollwork decoration, while the curved machete-type blade features a flat back.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Expertissim

Posted 1 month ago

ancientart:

The Mesoamerican archaeological site of Tula, located in Hidalgo, approximately 75km north of Mexico City, Mexico. 

Tula is thought to have been the historical capital of the Toltec state. Pictured in the top photo are the 16’ high colossal atlantids atop Pyramid B. These atlantids depict rulers or warriors armed with spear-throwers and darts. To date we actually still do not know a great deal about the Toltecs (their name meaning “makers of things”), whom the Aztecs claimed to have descended from.

Photos taken by AlejandroLinaresGarcia.